Now that Memorial Day has come and gone, summer is in full swing. Many teens are out of school, which gives them more reason to drive. Whether to get to work, social gatherings, or leisure, these youngsters take to the road more frequently during this time of the year. Unfortunately, though, this period of time following Memorial Day is often referred to as the “100 deadliest days.”

Why? Simply put, inexperienced teen drivers are more likely to be distracted and therefore more likely to be involved in a car accident. In fact, the American Automobile Association (AAA) recently found that those between the age of 16 and 17 were nearly four times more likely to be involved in a wreck. This age group was also nearly three times more likely to be involved in a fatal accident. Although many think that elderly drivers are the most dangerous, these statistics tell a much different story.

Perhaps the most tragic aspect of this issue is that these young motorists are posing a threat not only to themselves, but also to others. In fact, a significant number of those injured and killed in accidents caused by young teen drivers are individuals other than the teen driver. Although states have attempted to curtail this danger by increasing the age at which an individual can receive a license, and parents are doing more to ensure their children receive various driving experiences while supervised, the truth of the matter is that the accidents will continue to occur.

Those who have been hurt in one of these wrecks may want to consider their legal options. Pursuing a personal injury lawsuit may be the only way to recover damages suffered, which may include lost wages, pain and suffering, and medical expenses.

Source: TODAY, “Fatal car crashes nearly three times more likely in newly licensed teens,” Linda Carroll, Jun. 1, 2017